America’s Red State Growth Corridors: Low-tax, energy-rich regions in the heartland charge ahead as economies on both coasts sing the blues.

Commentary, Regulation, Joel Kotkin

Cheap U.S. natural gas has some envisioning the Mississippi River between New Orleans and Baton Rouge as an “American Ruhr.” Much of this growth, notes Eric Smith, associate director of the Tulane Energy Institute, will be financed by German and other European firms that are reeling from electricity costs now three times higher than in places like Louisiana.

The Trials of a Democratic Reformer: In California’s capital, union officials ‘walk around like they’re God.’ This pro-labor former legislator wants to bring them back to earth.

Worth A Look, Workplace, Frontier Centre

Former Los Angeles Lakers Coach Phil Jackson once referred to Sacramento as a “cowtown,” but Gloria Romero, a pro-labor Democrat who served as California’s Senate majority leader from 2001 to 2008, takes exception to the belittling description. The capitol building in Sacramento, she says, has “the eighth most powerful economy in the world under that dome,” and it operates not unlike other wealthy kleptocracies. “There’s no other way to say it politely. It’s owned.”

The Man Who Saved Capitalism: Milton Friedman, who would have turned 100 on Tuesday, helped to make free markets popular again in the 20th century. His ideas are even more important today.

Commentary, Taxation, Frontier Centre

It’s a tragedy that Milton Friedman—born 100 years ago on July 31—did not live long enough to combat the big-government ideas that have formed the core of Obamanomics. It’s perhaps more tragic that our current president, who attended the University of Chicago where Friedman taught for decades, never fell under the influence of the world’s greatest champion of the free market. Imagine how much better things would have turned out, for Mr. Obama and the country.