Profile Series: James Gladstone

In this age of Indigenous reconciliation, it is important to remember the Indigenous movers and shakers who have gone before and cleared the path for others. James Gladstone (1887-1971) was […]
Published on February 28, 2021

In this age of Indigenous reconciliation, it is important to remember the Indigenous movers and shakers who have gone before and cleared the path for others. James Gladstone (1887-1971) was such an Indigenous person. In the Blackfoot language, he was known as Akay-na-muka, meaning “Many Guns.” He was born in Mountain Hill, Northwest Territories. This community was near the Kainai reserve, as at the time the Northwest Territories included the territory of Alberta.

Read Joseph Quesnel’s full profile of James Gladstone HERE.

 

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